Archive of ‘elsewhere’ category

Memento Mori For Darkling Botanists

Kermit Tesoro Skull planter 1At Haute Macabre this I week squee over those exquisite skull planters created by Kermit Tesoro, who is a Filipino designer previously responsible for manifesting some beautifully grotesque, utterly magnificent avant-garde foot wear.

Read more: Kermit Tesoro’s Memento Mori For Darkling Botanists

There may or may not have been added squeeage due to the fact that The Order Of The Good Death shared the write up, making it the second thing I’ve written that they’ve shared this week and you’ll have to forgive me but I’m having a total SENPAI NOTICED ME moment.

Psssst…! Kermit is totally selling these! They are not up for purchase on his site though, and I haven’t got a link to share, but my best suggestion is to direct message him through Instagram, let him know you are interested in buying one, and give him your email address so that he can send you an invoice. Expect to spend around $105 or so in US monies.

Cutting Edge And Ancient: Fire & Bone

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At Haute Macabre this week I write about the wee wonders & miniature marvels created by the folks over at Fire & Bone.

These “armchair scientists and lovers of the natural world,” make tiny, true-to-life, animal skull reproductions derived from high-resolution 3D scans of original specimens, carefully miniaturized in a digital process, then cast in metal using traditional techniques. Exquisite! Adorable!

Read more at Haute Macabre | Cutting Edge And Ancient: Fire & Bone Creations

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Beautiful Monsters at the Creeping Museum

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The Creeping Museum is the nonprofit creative vision and labor of love conceived between two friends and a grilled cheese sandwich in a North Portland laundromat in the spring of 2016.  Their remarkable mission? To help artists and independent creators give back to their communities by turning their strange and unusual work into tiny pieces of affordable art in the form of collectible enamel pins– for which to support wonderfully worthy causes.

beautiful monstersThe Creeping Museum continues their mission of making the world a better place through kind hearts and spooky arts with the release of their most ambitious and highly anticipated collection to date: Beautiful Monsters. Inspired by the night creatures of Penny Dreadful, in support of the marginalized and forgotten, Beautiful Monsters is now available.
Read more at Haute Macabre today.

Bonus! I was honored to have made a small contribution to The Creeping Museum’s Eviscerate The Patriarchy auction (proceeds to benefit the Joyful Heart Foundation); believe it or not, I actually knit these mitts up in about 6-7 hours!
Photo credit: B. Brandt / Styling: Maika Keuben

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Bonus! Should you like to wish to swan about in a spookily elegant ensemble inspired by The Creeping Museum, Beautiful Monsters, and Penny Dreadful, see below. As always, click on the image to see a listing of items used.

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I Held My Own Death Cafe And You Can Too

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When I first read about the incredibly wonderful concept of Death Cafe, I was thrilled to learn such a thing existed and hoped to attend one nearby…alas, there were none to be found local to me. So I held my own! Read more about Death Cafe and and my experiences with them at Haute Macabre this week. today. Featured art by the always incredible Becky Munich.

Bonus: How to wear your own Death Cafe (or, as I like to think of it “How To Wear An Article About Holding Your Own Death Cafe”). As always, click on the image to be linked to the item details.dc1

Elsewhere: Evi Numen, Death Doula

evinumen_veilAt Haute Macabre this week I talk with Evi Numen about her role as a Death Doula. We discuss the need for this type of service in a society that lost the vital connection it once had with its dying and the dead, and the training involved in both bearing witness to the process of dying as well as easing the passage from this world to the next.

For the interview, Evi shared some of her exquisite Victorian tintypes, and noted “I’ve been collecting portraits of local Victorians for a while now, mostly in the form of albumen prints (cartes de visite) and tintypes. Most of the people in my collections are anonymous, and forgotten by history. Their portraits have made their way to flea markets and antique shops, no longer in the family album. I wanted to honor them by giving them a new narrative through painting… I think of them as small tributes to the individuals depicted.”

 

 

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